A conversation with... Gérard Fromanger

Friday, 15 april 2016 at 7pm

On the theme of the Water Lilies, leading figures from the art world are invited to share their admiration for Monet and talk about how they found sources of inspiration in the painter’s work for their own creations. These talks will be led by Philippe Piguet, art historian and journalist.


Gérard Fromanger was born in 1939 in Pontchartrain. He lives and works in Paris and Italy.
From 1960, he established himself as a leading figure on the Paris art scene at a very young age by taking part in the new movement of Narrative Figuration. In 1964, after meeting Giacometti, he began showing his work at the Aimé Maeght gallery.
He was one of the founders of the Atelier des Beaux-Arts in 1968, which produced many political posters. He subsequently, and in a similar vein, went on to produce "films tracts" with Jean-Luc Godard.
May 68, the consumer society, red silhouettes, street scenes, Prévert, Deleuze, Foucault and photorealism set the scene of his artistic interventions, which underline the strong inter-connection of painting and politics.
Gérard Fromanger uses the camera to create images without any deliberate viewpoint, without any specific framing, "images taken as a film of the anonymous movement of what is happening", as Michel Foucault wrote of him.
Between 1974 and 2015, some thirty retrospective exhibitions were dedicated to him around the world, particularly in 2012 at the Fondation Leclerc in Landerneau, and around one hundred of his artworks have entered public collections and those of various museums and foundations. The Centre Pompidou is currently showing around fifty of his works from 1964 to 2015 aiming to bring out the expressions of the dualism that is central to his work a passion for the pictorial and concern for the world (until 16 May 2016).