Editorial

A SEASON OF COLOUR

In autumn 2018, the Musée de l’Orangerie is opening two rooms on the permanent collections level, to be given over to new presentations of works. These will offer new interpretations of the collection and accompany the highlights of the programme, the focus of which is colour.

In autumn, the exhibition The Cruel Stories of Paula Rego will highlight the links between the baroque, fanciful and political realm of this powerful woman artist from the London Group and 19th century visual and literary sources - Goya, Redon, Grandville, Degas, the Brontë sisters and Balzac.

In the spring, there will be the first combined retrospective in France of the German Expressionist painters, Franz Marc and August Macke, whose dazzling coloured paintings of landscapes and animals embodied the Blaue Reiter movement. 

On the visitor circuit, the permanent collections will be presented in a new space where the focus is on themes and works connected with the Jean Walter-Paul Guillaume collection, with a mix of painted, sculpted and graphic works, and paper, audio and film archives. The first focus will be on the friendship between Claude Monet and Georges Clemenceau, and will start on 12 November 2018, as part of Clemenceau commemorative year and the programme for the Centenary of the Great War.

The new contemporary room will accommodate a series of counterpoints to the masterpiece of the Orangerie, the Water Lilies. Contemporary works will be shown regularly - painting, photography, sculpture, video, installations - inspired across a broad spectrum by this immersive, landscaped, floral and coloured, plant-covered and organic, contemplative and spiritual, light and melancholy and even unsettling installation here in the museum. In October, for the Nuit Blanche festival and the FIAC international art fair, the American artist Richard Jackson will design a series of wall paintings in a powerful and off-beat tribute to the Water Lilies

These contemporary notes will bring a new mood to the Musée de l’Orangerie, strengthened by a brand new programme, Dance among the Water Lilies, launched last June with a Merce Cunningham Event. There will be a monthly performance of excerpts of dances from the modern and contemporary repertoire, by leading choreographers who will make every evening a unique event.

Finally, as every year, on 6 October as part of the Nuit Blanche festival, the Night of the Quartet will take place until the early hours with a series of concerts devised by ProQuartet - chamber music pieces interspersed with contemporary creations written by female composers.

I hope that this broad selection of encounters and events will make this inspirational and welcoming museum a lively and coherent place for contemplation, enjoyment and reflection.

Cécile Debray, director of the Musée de l'Orangerie